VADETS

Virginia Association for Driver Education and Traffic Safety

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  • Saturday, September 02, 2017 10:26 AM | Robin Shepherd (Administrator)

    It’s that time of year again when schools will soon be back in full swing. That means busy playgrounds, more kids running across the street and yellow school buses seemingly everywhere. Motorists can prepare for the back-to-school driving season by following a few simple safety tips. 
     
    Slow Down! The speed limit in school zones is reduced to 25 mph. Watch for children walking in the street, especially if there are no sidewalks in the neighborhood. Also, look for children playing and congregating near bus stops. Remember to always come to a complete stop at stop signs, checking carefully for children on sidewalks and in crosswalks before proceeding. 
     
    Yield to School Busses Exercise caution when approaching a school bus or driving near bus stops. NEVER pass a school bus while its lights are flashing and children are entering or exiting the bus. Yellow flashing lights indicate that the bus is preparing to stop to load or unload children. You should slow down and prepare to stop. Red flashing lights and an extended stop arm indicate that the bus has stopped, and that children are getting on or off. Motorists must stop their cars and wait until the red lights stop flashing, the extended stop sign is withdrawn, and the bus begins moving before they can start driving again. You may also have to stop if traveling in the opposite direction of the bus and it has stopped with red flashing lights, depending on the circumstances. 
     
    Be Alert and Eliminate Distractions Be aware that children often behave unpredictably, so keep an eye out for kids darting into the street or crossing without first looking both ways for traffic. On streets without crossing guards, pay special attention to children trying to cross the street. Be especially careful on streets without sidewalks or streets with on-street parking as it may be hard to notice a child emerging from behind a car
     
    Reverse Responsibly Check for children on the sidewalk, driveway and around your vehicle before slowly backing up. If you have children, teach them to never play in, under or around vehicles – even those that are parked. 
     
    Watch for Bicycles 
    Children on bikes are often inexperienced, unsteady and unpredictable. Slow down and allow at least three feet of passing distance between your vehicle and the bicycle. Always keep an eye out for bicyclists in hot spots like marked school zones, bike lanes and near bus stops. 
     
    Look Out for New/Inexperienced Drivers When driving (especially near high school campuses), keep in mind that a higher number of motorists you encounter may be teens hitting the road for the first time. While learning to drive, teens may be overly tentative or make unexpected maneuvers. Be patient, forgiving and remember to practice your defensive driving techniques. 
    Most accidents can be avoided if even just one party is paying close attention. Besides having less experience, teen drivers are more often impulsive or distracted, so you need to do your part to ensure their safety. 
     
    Being aware of back-to-school season driving challenges and following these driving guidelines can help make the streets safer for everyone. 

    Provided by Allstate

  • Tuesday, January 05, 2016 7:40 PM | Robin Shepherd (Administrator)
    Amendment 46.2-325
    Driver Improvement Course
    o
    Delegate Betsy Carr
    General Assembly Building
    PO Box 14625 Richmond, VA. 23221
    This amendment will allow everyone to take a Re-exam Cours
    e if the learner's
    permit test was failed three times regardless of their age
    .
    Currently, 19 years and older are the only ones permitted to t
    ake an 8 hour
    course. All others must retake a 36 hour classroom course. I
    f in agreement,
    please write this Delegate.
    Amendment 46.2-325
    Driver Improvement Course
    o
    Delegate Betsy Carr
    General Assembly Building
    PO Box 14625 Richmond, VA. 23221
    This amendment will allow everyone to take a Re-exam Cours
    e if the learner's
    permit test was failed three times regardless of their age
    .
    Currently, 19 years and older are the only ones permitted to t
    ake an 8 hour
    course. All others must retake a 36 hour classroom course. I
    f in agreement,
    please write this Delegate.
    Amendment 46.2-325
    Driver Improvement Course
    o
    Delegate Betsy Carr
    General Assembly Building
    PO Box 14625 Richmond, VA. 23221
    This amendment will allow everyone to take a Re-exam Cours
    e if the learner's
    permit test was failed three times regardless of their age
    .
    Currently, 19 years and older are the only ones permitted to t
    ake an 8 hour
    course. All others must retake a 36 hour classroom course. I
    f in agreement,
    please write this Delegate.
    Amendment 46.2-325
    Driver Improvement Course
    o
    Delegate Betsy Carr
    General Assembly Building
    PO Box 14625 Richmond, VA. 23221
    This amendment will allow everyone to take a Re-exam Cours
    e if the learner's
    permit test was failed three times regardless of their age
    .
    Currently, 19 years and older are the only ones permitted to t
    ake an 8 hour
    course. All others must retake a 36 hour classroom course. I
    f in agreement,
    please write this Delegate.

    Delegate Betsy Carr

    General Assembly Building

    PO Box 14625 Richmond, VA.  23221


    This amendment will allow everyone to take a Re-exam Course if the learner's permit test was failed three times regardless of their age.

    Currently, 19 years and older are the only ones permitted to take an 8 hour course.  All others must retake a 36 hour classroom course. 


    If in agreement, please write this Delegate.


  • Sunday, November 15, 2015 8:25 PM | Robin Shepherd (Administrator)

    November is the month a driver is most likely to collide with a deer in the U.S. Overall, U.S. drivers have a one in 169 chance of colliding with a deer. 

     

    State Farm recently released its 13th annual deer-vehicle collision study. This year’s study, based on the most extensive auto insurance database in the U.S., shows drivers are just as likely to have a claim involving a collision with deer, elk or moose as they were in 2014. State Farm again provides their popular listing of states according to where deer-vehicle collisions are most likely for any one driver, along with an interactive map that illustrates the geographic variation in the likelihood of these mishaps and in the magnitude of change in likelihood in each state from a year ago.

     

    State Farm Interactive map: http://st8.fm/deer


  • Saturday, November 07, 2015 9:48 AM | Robin Shepherd (Administrator)

    The November Click It or Ticket Mini-Mobilization enforcement dates areThursday, Nov. 19 through Thursday, Nov. 26, 2015Unbelted fatalities are increasing in Virginia, so please help save lives this holiday season by participating in the mini-mobilization.

     

    Click It or Ticket materials are available through DRIVE SMART Virginia’s online store. Thanksgiving-related campaign materials are also on the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) website. And while you’re there, check out the Halloween campaign materials for the upcoming sober driving effort.


  • Thursday, September 10, 2015 8:46 PM | Robin Shepherd (Administrator)

    The Board of Directors of VADETS would like to invite you to submit nominations for Teacher of the Year.  


    Please visit the link to nominate a deserving teacher: http://tinyurl.com/vadetsteacheroftheyear

  • Thursday, September 10, 2015 9:32 AM | Robin Shepherd (Administrator)

    Once again VADETS will sponsor a Poster, Bumper Sticker and License Plate contest. The contest will be held at the VADETS State Conference this fall.  The theme is general traffic safety. It is hoped that students will select issues or topics which, they feel, are important to driver education.


    Each school should conduct its own contest and teachers are responsible for sending the best five (5) in each category to the conference.


    Poster Specifications:

     Overall poster size must be 14” x 22”.

     Poster must be illustrated on the VERTICAL AXIS.

     The student’s name, address, and school must be printed on the back of the poster.

     Poster themes must be original and correct in safety concept and the exclusive work of the student.

     Illustrations should be positive in approach and demonstrate proper traffic behaviors.

     Freehand drawn letters only.

     No limitation on the use and number of colors.

     Do NOT laminate posters.


    Bumper Sticker Specifications:

     Size 15” x 4”

     Poster must be illustrated on HORIZONAL AXIS.

     The student’s name, address, and school must be printed on the back of the bumper sticker.

     Bumper sticker themes must be original and correct in safety concept and the exclusive work of the student.

     Illustrations should be positive in approach and demonstrate proper traffic behaviors.

     Freehand drawn letters only.

     No limitation on the use and number of colors.

     Do NOT laminate bumper stickers.


    License Plate Specifications:

     Size 12” x 6”

     License plates must be illustrated on the HORIZONAL axis.

     The student’s name, address, and school must be printed on the back of the license plate.

     License plate themes must be original and correct in safety concept and the exclusive work of the student.

     Illustrations should be positive in approach and demonstrate proper traffic behaviors.

     Freehand drawn letters only.

     No limitation on the use and number of colors.

     Do NOT laminate license plates.


    Judging Criteria:

     Relationship of design to safety practices.                                         

     Originality.

     Artwork.

     Visual impact of design.


  • Sunday, July 05, 2015 10:27 PM | Robin Shepherd (Administrator)

    Law Changes Include Safety Provisions for Bicyclists, Postal Vehicles


    Several new traffic laws take effect July 1 in Virginia. The 2015 General Assembly amended state code to increase safety provisions for traffic management vehicles, bicyclists, postal vehicles, and refuse-collection vehicles, among other initiatives.


    Here are a few highlights:

    • Vehicles that assist with the management of roadside and traffic incidents or perform traffic management services along highways may be equipped with flashing, blinking, or alternating amber warning lights, qualifying these vehicles for Virginia’s “Move Over” law. The “Move Over” law requires drivers to proceed with caution and, if reasonable, change lanes when approaching stationary emergency vehicles on highways.
    • Drivers passing a stationary mail vehicle displaying a flashing, blinking or alternating amber light must proceed with due caution and maintain a safe speed for road conditions.
    • Bicycles, mopeds and other non-motorized vehicles are now included in the list of vehicles for which a motorist can be cited for following too closely.
    • When passing stationary refuse-collection vehicles on roadways with less than four lanes, the driver must decrease his speed by 10 mph below the posted speed limit and pass at least two feet to the left of the vehicle. When passing a stationary refuse-collection vehicle on a roadway with at least four lanes – and at least two lanes intended for traffic proceeding in the same direction – the driver must pass in a lane not adjacent to the vehicle and yield the right of way.
    • Motorists may cross double yellow lines to pass a pedestrian or a device moved by human power, including a bicycle, skateboard or foot scooter, if such movement can be made safely.


    In addition, a change in the law now allows a Virginia resident convicted in federal court of an offense substantially similar to Virginia's DUI laws to petition the Virginia general district court in the jurisdiction in which he resides for restricted driving privileges. Previously, only residents convicted of DUI in Virginia courts or other states’ courts could petition.


    A restricted driver’s license allows a DUI offender to drive for limited purposes, such as going to work or church, while his license is suspended. In Virginia, a conviction of first-offense DUI is punishable by a mandatory fine and a one-year license revocation. The installation of an ignition interlock device is a condition of receiving a restricted driver’s license. The interlock condition has also now been extended to Virginia residents who have been convicted of a substantially similar DUI offense under the laws of another state or the United States. The DUI-related changes went into effect immediately after passage earlier this year.


  • Sunday, June 28, 2015 8:39 PM | Robin Shepherd (Administrator)



    The Samsung safety truck is equipped with a front camera and four rear monitors to help motorists pass trucks safely.  The project is still in the early stages.  Will the truck of the future save lives or distract drivers? 


    Read more here:  http://global.samsungtomorrow.com/the-safety-truck-could-revolutionize-road-safety/


  • Thursday, June 11, 2015 9:48 PM | Robin Shepherd (Administrator)
    Relative to a supervised driving certification log approach, teens taking driver education appear to have fewer crashes and injury or fatal crashes as well as fewer traffic violations and alcohol-related traffic violations during their first two years of independent driving.


    Read more here:  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0001457515001943


  • Thursday, June 11, 2015 9:38 PM | Robin Shepherd (Administrator)
    Getting a driver’s license at 16 is considered a rite of passage in American culture. But this exciting coming-of-age has instead become a death sentence for thousands of teens each year. Motor-vehicle accidents continue to be the leading cause of death among people between the ages of 16 and 19, the age group with the highest risk of crashes.


    Read more here:  http://wallethub.com/edu/best-worst-states-for-teen-drivers/4598/

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